SSSP 2019 Annual Meeting

Date: Friday, August 9

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 046: Disability and Relationships Across the Life Course
Room: Riverside Suite

Sponsors: Disability
Family
Youth, Aging, and the Life Course

Organizer &

Presider: J. Dalton Stevens, Syracuse University

Description:  Disability is simultaneously a relational experience, identity, complex life course process, minority status, and form of oppression. This session is comprised of papers that explore disability and social relationships across the life course including papers focused on but not limited to (1) family dynamics, (2) partnering, (3) sexuality, (4) gender, (5) friendships, (6) social networks, (7) employment, (8) disability theory, (9) identity, (10) stigma, (11) health care, (12) education, and (13) benefit program participation. This session intends to bring together a diverse array of papers focused on describing and explaining social relationships during different times in the life course experienced by people with disability. This area is historically underdeveloped, and this session addresses the gap in the disability and life course literature pertaining to barriers, facilitators, opportunities, and experiences of social relationships for those with disability.

Papers:

“Earlier and Risk Free: New Approaches to Prenatal Screening and New Problems,” Barbara Katz Rothman, The Graduate Center, CUNY

“I Don’t Do Well with Probabilities: Mothers’ Stake-lowering Work with Cell-free DNA Prenatal Screening,” Aleksa Owen, University of California, Berkeley

“‘Men Are from Mars and Women Are from Venus’: The Erotic Habitus of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Ontario, Canada,” Alan Santinele Martino, McMaster University

“Stuck in Transition with You: Variable Pathways to In(ter)dependence for Emerging Adult Men with Mobility Impairments,” J. Dalton Stevens, Syracuse University, Winner of the Disability Division’s Student Paper Competition

“Postponed Retirement Delays Cognitive Decline: Using Counterfactual Causal Inference to Disentangle Life-course Risk Factors for Later-life Cognitive Decline,” Jo Mhairi Hale, University of St Andrews, Maarten J. Bijlsma and Angelo Lorenti, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research