SSSP 2019 Annual Meeting

Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 099: Inequities in Health, Care and Contexts II
Room: Hudson Suite

Sponsors: Health, Health Policy, and Health Services
Poverty, Class, and Inequality

Organizers: Hannah Andrews, University of Arizona
Elizabeth A. Sternke, Press Ganey Associates

Presider: Kathleen Abrahamson, Purdue University

Papers:

“Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Act as a Point of Entry into the Healthcare System? Evaluating the Motivating Factors behind the Use of CAM Services by the Hispanic/Latinx Population,” Angela Vergara and Fernando I. Rivera, University of Central Florida

“Illuminating the Social Dimensions of Racial Disparities in Socio-physiological Causes of Infant Mortality in the U.S.,” Ahmad Khalili, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

“Mental Illness and Mental Health Care Treatment among Persons with Criminal Justice Involvement in the United States,” Anastasiia Kuptsevych-Timmer and Kathryn M. Nowotny, University of Miami

“Race and Gender Disparities in Mental Health Services,” Juan Ramón Sevilla, Beverly Teresa Cotter and Mary Yu Danico, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

“Race/Ethnicity, Social Roles and Mental Health: Is there Evidence of a Tri-racial System?” Pamela Braboy Jackson, Indiana University and Christy Erving, Vanderbilt University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 100: Sanctuary: Here (NYC) and Beyond
Room: Plaza Suite

Sponsor: Law and Society

Organizer, Presider &

Discussant: Felicia Arriaga, Appalachian State University

Description:  The special project will allow for discussion between Donald Anthonyson, the Director of Families for Freedom (FFF) and division members, in order to better understand immigration enforcement, detention, deportation practices and policies. The hope is that division members will then be able to consider how they might take this back to their own communities. Division member(s) are also expected to bring their own experiences in this arena to have an informed discussion about various efforts throughout the country.

Mr. Anthonyson has been a member of Families for Freedom (FFF) since 2004. At FFF, Donald was previously a lead organizer, former Board member, and has led the efforts of the International Deportee Justice Campaign. He also produced for a monthly radio show, the War On Immigrants Report that aired on on 99.5 FM WBAI. Donald migrated to the US in 1979 from Antigua and has been involved in various social issues ranging from police brutality (Elenanor Bumphus Justice Committee) and anti-racial responses (NYASA) to immigration.

Founded in September 2002, FFF is a New York-based multi-ethnic human rights organization by and for families facing and fighting deportation. They are immigrant prisoners (detainees), former immigrant prisoners, their loved ones, or individuals at risk of deportation. They come from dozens of countries, across continents. FFF seeks to repeal the laws that are tearing apart our homes and neighborhoods; and to build the power of immigrant communities as communities of color, to provide a guiding voice in the growing movement for immigrant rights as human rights.

FFF has evolved into an organizing center against deportation. They are a source of support, education, and campaigns for directly affected families and communities -- locally and nationally.

Panelist:

Felicia Arriaga, Appalachian State University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 101: CRITICAL DIALOGUE: Trauma, Transience, and Transformation: Community-Engaged Partnerships for Change
Room: Promenade Suite

Sponsors: Community Research and Development
Teaching Social Problems

Organizer &

Presider: Sarah E. Stanlick, Lehigh University

Description:  This session will focus on community partnerships around complex social issues with a bias towards action and positive social change.

Papers:

“Hidden Communities: Friendship as a Form of Resistance in Prison,” Sheri-Lynn S. Kurisu, California State University, San Marcos

“Research Oriented, Community-university Partnership: Point-in-time Count of People Experiencing Homelessness in Sacramento County,” Arturo Baiocchi, Susanna Curry, Ethan J. Evans and Shannon Williams, California State University, Sacramento

“A Social Network Analysis of Muslim-led Groups in the Triangle Area of North Carolina,” Lela S. Ali, Duke University

“Community-based Research on the Impact of a Transitional Housing Program Serving for Homeless Veterans,” Mieko Yamada, Purdue University Fort Wayne

“Fighting Anti-homeless Laws through Participatory Action Research: Lessons from the San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness Study,” Lisa Marie Alatorre, San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness, Chris Herring, University of California, Berkeley and Dilara Yarbrough, San Francisco State University

“The Inside-out Prison Exchange Program as a Transformative Learning Experience: Assessing Shifts in Crime Attribution and Higher-order Thinking,” Brian Wyant, La Salle University and Brian Lockwood, Monmouth University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 102: Disability and Labor
Room: State Suite

Sponsors: Disability
Institutional Ethnography
Labor Studies

Organizers: Jennifer D. Brooks, Syracuse University
Doron Dorfman, Syracuse University
Alison Fisher, York University

Presider &

Discussant: Jennifer D. Brooks, Syracuse University

Description:  The relationship between disability and labor is complex and multidimensional. Disability can be viewed as both a discursive category, and as a social relation that is actively organized and coordinated through relations of power, similar to race, class, and gender. Thus, disability, as a social category, shapes how individuals both produce and consume labor. Structural and individual-level barriers to the labor market participation of individuals with disabilities have led to their dramatic unemployment/underemployment rates. This lack of participation in the labor market has simultaneously resulted in and maintained the belief that individuals with disabilities are ‘unfit’ labor producers--furthering their occupational and social segregation. People with disabilities also rely on the labor produced by others (such as caregivers, personal assistants, family members, surrogate mothers, friends, partners, and others) to fully participate in social life. This type of labor is often unpaid and goes unrecognized. To examine the relationship between disability and labor, this session seeks papers that cover a wide range of topics including: the exploration of structural and individual-level barriers to labor market/economic participation, intersectionality, dilemmas related to consumption of labor, the unpaid/unrecognized nature of care work, workplace experiences (both of people with disabilities as employers and as employees), and how policies and texts* shape the experiences of people with disabilities as both labor producers and consumers. *We define text as both discourses (in the Foucaldian sense) and various other texts (collective agreements, codes of ethics, even mundane 'texts' such as bus schedules, computer interfaces, etc.).

Papers:

“Disabled and Poor in the Bay Area: How SSI and SSDI Beneficiaries Work around and within Current Labor Incentive Programs,” Katie Savin, University of California, Berkeley

“Limitations of Disadvantage: Examining the Association between Functional Limitations, ADL/IADL Disability, and Labor Market Inequality,” Jennifer D. Brooks, Syracuse University

“Public Disability Benefits as Harm Reduction: Income as Part of Complex Care Management,” Ariana Thompson-Lastad, University of California, San Francisco, Mark D. Fleming, University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Francisco, Meredith Van Natta, Duke University, Sara Rubin, University of California, San Francisco, Irene H. Yen, University of California, Merced and University of California, San Francisco, Janet K. Shim and Tessa M. Nápoles, University of California, San Francisco and Nancy J. Burke, University of California, Merced and University of California, San Francisco

“Self-determination in Transportation: The Route to Social Inclusion for People with Disabilities,” Jessica A. Murray, The Graduate Center, CUNY


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

SPECIAL

Session 103: The Academic Job Market
Room: Broadway Suite

Sponsor: Program Committee

Organizer &

Presider: Héctor L. Delgado, University of La Verne

Description:  This session is designed to provide participants with ideas on how to improve their chances of finding an academic position. Panelists with experience (some of it very recent) looking and hiring for positions will kick off the discussion, but ample opportunity will be given to participants to share their own experiences and ask questions.

The sooner in their graduate careers that individuals begin thinking about going on the market, the better it is, since there are things that they can do in graduate school to improve their prospects. So, this session is for Society members currently looking for a position, but also for anyone who plans to be on the market in the next three-four years -- and for anyone who feels that s/he has useful information to share with others about her/his own experiences.

Panelists:

Adriana Leela Bohm, Delaware County Community College

Kristen M. Budd, Miami University

Héctor L. Delgado, University of La Verne

Elroi J. Windsor, University of West Georgia


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

SPECIAL

Session 104: The World As It Should Be: Lessons from the 2019 Thomas C. Hood Social Action Award Winner
Room: East End Suite

Sponsor: Program Committee

Organizer, Presider &

Discussant: Johanna Foster, Monmouth University

Description:  Representatives from Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson, the New York City area winner of the 2019 Thomas C. Hood Social Action Award, will discuss the organization’s mission and crucial work, as well as its strong roots in, and current ties to, the field of sociology. Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson is a grassroots community organization that brings together people in the Hudson Valley region most directly impacted by injustice to fight around the issues that deeply affect their communities, and to challenge the systems of power that are at the root of these problems. Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson is committed to building working class power in order to strengthen social movements, end oppression, and realize a world that puts people before profit. In recent years, the organization has led grassroots campaigns around the issues of foreclosures and evictions, energy insecurity, and immigrant rights.


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 105: Gentrification: Sense of Belonging and Community
Room: Fashion Suite

Sponsor: Program Committee

Organizer, Presider &

Discussant: Katherine Everhart, Tusculum University

Papers:

“Forms of Capital and Vocabularies of Discontent: Framing Urban Transformation in Istanbul,” Aras Koksal, University of Minnesota

“The Social (Re)Production of Nashville’s Geography of Homelessness,” Damian T. Williams, Concordia University

“The Other Side of Rosa L. Parks Boulevard: Commercial Gentrification and a Sense of Belonging,” Katherine Everhart, Tusculum University

“Place Attachment, Displacement, and Alienation in Gentrifying Neighborhoods,” Steven Tuttle, Loyola University Chicago


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 106: Black Radical Sociology
Room: Fifth Avenue Suite

Sponsor: Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Organizers: Orly Clerge, University of California, Davis
Jose Itzigsohn, Brown University

Presider: Orly Clerge, University of California, Davis

Discussant: Deirdre Royster, New York University

Papers:

“Examining White Oppression in Everyday Life: Connecting Macro, Meso, and Micro Racial Theory and Conceptualizing White Teamwork and the Unity in White Racism,” Daniel J. Delgado, Texas A&M University-San Antonio and Frank J. Ortega, Diablo Valley College

“The Occlusion of Empire in the Race vs Class Inequality Debate: A Case Study of the Narrowing of Black Marxist Thought in the Sociology of Race,” Julia C. Bates, Sacred Heart University

“The Social Darwinism of Diversity Initiatives: Tracing the Troubled Lineage from Eugenics to the Neoliberal University,” Juliet R. Kunkel and Rachel D. Roberson, University of California, Berkeley

“The Sociological Dream: Reconstructed Pasts and Speculative Futures in W. E. B. Du Bois’s Black Flame Trilogy,” Freeden Blume Oeur, Tufts University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 107: Social Welfare and Family II
Room: Lexington Suite

Sponsors: Family
Sociology and Social Welfare

Organizer: Kristin Wilson, Cabrillo College

Facilitator &

Discussant: Ainsley Lambert-Swain, Bellarmine University

Papers:

“‘I Was Trying to Fit In’: White Interracial Partners’ Identity Management in Non-white Spaces,” Ainsley Lambert-Swain, Bellarmine University

“‘Willing to Do Anything for My Kids’: Diapers, Inventive Mothering, and Invisible Inequalities of Carework,” Jennifer M. Randles, California State University, Fresno

“Ambivalence and Limitations on Speaking of Regret or Adoptees’ Intimate Labor in Transnational Adoptive Families,” Lisa Gulya, University of Minnesota

“Daughters’ Unpaid Family Work in Brazil: Connections to Mothers’ Work for Pay and Educational Consequences,” Aida Villanueva and Maria Carolina Aragão, The University of Texas at Austin


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 108: Social Policy for Systemic Change
Room: Riverside Suite

Sponsor: Conflict, Social Action, and Change

Organizer &

Presider: Ezra J. Temko, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Discussant: Amani M. Awwad, SUNY Canton

Papers:

“An American Dream for All: Poverty, Welfare, and Activism,” Sheila M. Katz, University of Houston

“Legislating in the ‘Grey Areas’ of Sexual Violence: The #MeToo Movement and Rape Law in Sweden,” Caitlin Carroll, The University of Texas at Austin

“The Role of the Fatherhood Pride Project Addressing Family Dynamics and Improving the Social in Social Problems: A Reprise and Update,” Jeffry A. Will and Logan Ortiz, University of North Florida

“When Protest(ers) Graduate: Moving from Student Demands to Structural Change at a Comprehensive Liberal Arts,” Belisa Gonzalez and Sean Eversley Bradwell, Ithaca College


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 109: CRITICAL DIALOGUE: Critical Issues in Education
Room: Sutton Suite

Sponsor: Program Committee

Organizer: E. Brooke Kelly, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Presider: Loretta E. Bass, University of Oklahoma

Papers:

“Academic Career Time for STEM Baccalaureates in the U.S. 1995 - 2014,” Yun Kyung Cho, University of Wisconsin-Madison

“‘Is My Application That Weak?’: A Need Validation in the Graduate Application Process,” Josalie C. Condon, University of Central Florida

“Does Religious Study Yield Economic Returns? A Case Study in Ultra-orthodox Education,” Miriam R. Moster, The Graduate Center, CUNY

“Perceptions of Career and Technical Education in a College for All Culture,” Linda M. Waldron, Jane Rochmes, Laine Briddell, Jaime Harris and Tripp Riggins, Christopher Newport University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 110: Networking Event: Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Publishing
Room: Vanderbilt Suite

Sponsor: Program Committee

Organizer &

Presider: E. Brooke Kelly, University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Description:  The Networking Event: Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Publishing is designed to facilitate interaction between SSSP members from diverse disciplines at the Annual Meeting to foster interdisciplinary relationships that lead to publications. A panel of scholars with a track record of publishing and editing from a range of topic areas will discuss relevant journals for submissions, tips on actually getting articles published in those journals, and collaboration with multiple authors. After some brief general advice from the panel, graduate student members and experienced scholars will meet up and circulate among roundtables for networking opportunities. Attendees are encouraged to bring ideas for future papers and research projects, as well as active research projects and papers that could use additional support.

Panelists:

Ranita Ray, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Barbara Katz Rothman, The Graduate Center, CUNY

David G. Embrick, University of Connecticut

Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University


Date: Saturday, August 10

Time: 2:30 PM - 4:10 PM

Session 111: Neoliberal Globalization and Environmental Injustice
Room: York Suite

Sponsors: Environment and Technology
Global

Organizer &

Presider: Nikhil Deb, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Description:  The session has a number of papers highlighting the nexus between neoliberal globalization and environmental/climate injustice. It has both case-study and quantitative research evidences (Such as in Latin America and North America) critical to understanding the environmental (in)justice issues we face today within and outside the U.S.

Papers:

“Power, Violence and Environmental Conflict: 21st Century Coal Transition in Colombia,” Tamra L. Gilbertson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

“Landscapes of Destruction, Landscapes of Waste: The Production of Enviro-racialized Landscapes as Strategies of Capital Accumulation and Processes of Bodily Dispossessions,” Christopher Oliver, Tulane University and Victor Torres Velez, Hostos Community College

“Dumping in Dixie Revisited: Spatial Clustering of Toxic Releases in the U.S., 1987-2017,” Tanesha A. Thomas, The Graduate Center, CUNY

“The Effects of Structural Features of the Trade of Natural Resources on Environmental Degradation,” Danielle J. Vesia, University of California, Irvine

“Constructing a Sustainable Food System? Alternative Food Networks in Buenos Aires, Argentina,” Isaac Leslie, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Clara Craviotti, National Scientific and Technical Research Council