Call for Abstracts, Chapters, Conferences, Papers, Proposals, and Events

If you wish to have a conference announcement posted, please send an email to ssspgra@utk.edu (Microsoft Word files and PDFs preferred). Please include a URL for more information, if available.

There is no charge to place an announcement on this website. Announcements for call for papers, book chapters, or articles will be posted until the submission deadline. Conference announcements will be posted until the date of the conference has passed.   

Call for Papers
Call for Proposals
Ongoing Calls
Conferences
Events

Call for Papers

Call for Papers
Special Issue on Unraveling Violence, Gendered Extremism: Interdisciplinary and Global Perspectives and Challenges  
The Journal Crime Media Culture
Guest Editors: Sara Salman, PhD and Dr. Veronika Nagy, PhD
Abstracts should be submitted by May 30, 2024

What constitutes violent extremism? Could violent extremism ever be considered a legitimate social reaction? Would critical analyses on gender provide a better understanding of extremism when we turn towards the so-called Global South? Can we explore the cultural alienation processes that generate gendered extremism violence in a mediatized global context?  This call for papers titled “Unraveling Violence, Gendered Extremism” aims to explore the ways in which gender is used to explain and narrate extremist violence such as terrorism and mass violence events like rampage killings. 

This special Issue of the Journal Crime Media Culture is seeking to collect interdisciplinary perspectives on the intersections of violent extremism, cultural dynamics of history, space and politics, and power and legitimacy. As guest editors, we hope to challenge taken for granted definitions of violence extremism and extremist violence, the gendered characteristics of those who commit it, as well as how gender is discursively, politically and strategically, used to construct, understand, and diffuse extremist violence in different contexts. 

Though scholars in policing, criminal justice and even in some social scientific studies claim that most of what is considered extremist attacks are perpetrated by men, and explanations of the violence tend to posit it as an aberration that is intrinsically linked to dominant expressions of masculinity (Kalish and Kimmel 2010), these leave many of the current cases unanswered. In the aftermath of 9/11, violent extremism was mainly associated with ideological factors that attract men and women to join Islamist groups, and thus positioned these men and women as culturally alienated, and simplified in the dichotomy of global conflicts (for example, Bakker 2006, Sageman 2008, van den Bos 2020).  Such alienation suggests that violent extremism is morally reprehensible, and relegates it to other people, despite the ubiquity of violence globally. Elsewhere, scholars note different motivations for violence such as relative deprivation, political corruption, and competition over natural resources Banunle and Apau 2019, and Khan, Khan and Ahmed, 2022). Studies on violent extremism in Kenya for instance note that although most violent extremists are men, idealized masculinity does not appear to be significant motivators (Allen et. al., 2015). Research in Malaysia challenges the discursive framing of Muslim women as “jihadi brides,” and points to the complexity of recruitment of women into terrorism and examining human trafficking and grooming of young women ( Abdul Hamid 2024). 

The divergent perspectives present a challenge to understanding what is called violent extremism, who perpetrates it, and under what conditions, as well as the social and cultural context in which the violence and knowledge about violence are embedded. 

The issue seeks to explore unpresented ways in which gender is (or should be) used as an analytical lens to explain extremist violence and trouble the normative theoretical frameworks of violent extremism. We are seeking contributions exploring the scope and intersection of race/ethnic identity, gender, class and geopolitics to understand what is contextually considered extremist and to how such understandings are discursively hegemonic. 

We welcome submissions that delve into gender and violent extremism through Indigenous, Global South/Southern, and queer theoretical lenses. Additionally, we invite submissions that employ qualitative research methods, including opensource data analysis, digital methodologies, interviews, and ethnographic studies. Interdisciplinary contributions from the social sciences and humanities are highly encouraged, and scholars specializing in anthropology, sociology, geography, and criminology are particularly invited to submit their work. 

Submission timeline: 
Abstract submissions: May 30, 2024 
June 15, 2024 Abstracts accepted, and authors notified 
Aug 25, 2024 Full articles submitted for peer review 
September, 2024 Authors notified of review outcome 
November 2024 Final article submission – for proofs    

Abstracts should be between 300-500 words, excluding references (which should be provided in Harvard format). All abstracts require accompanying author biographies of 100 words. Both must be sent in Word or PDF format to Sara Salman, sara.salman@vuw.ac.nz

Authors of accepted abstracts shall submit the full draft paper (word count around 6000-8000 words) by 25 Aug, 2024. All articles will be double blind peer reviewed. There are no fees payable for publication. 

If you have any further questions please email Sara Salman, sara.salman@vuw.ac.nz   

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Call for Papers
AI and Socio-Cultural Perspectives from the Global South 
Guest Editors: Glenn Muschert & Arindam Das
Abstracts should be submitted by June 1, 2024

We are excited to announce a special issue on the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) & socio-cultural contexts, with a focus on the Global South. As AI technologies continue to evolve, it’s crucial to critically examine their impact on diverse societies, particularly those that have been historically underrepresented & economically disadvantaged.

Venue: The Russian Sociological Review (Q1, hashtag#OA, no fees!), published at the Higher School of Economics.

Guest Editors: Glenn Muschert & Arindam Das

Full Call for Papers: https://sociologica.hse.ru/en/news/919765321.html

Background: AI development has predominantly occurred in the techno-progressive Global North, leaving the Global South facing unique challenges in adopting and leveraging AI. From data infrastructure to ethical guidelines, there’s much to explore.

Themes & Topics: We invite original research papers that delve into the following areas:
- AI & Cultural Perspectives: How do cultural contexts shape AI ethics and biases?
- AI for Social Good: Explore AI applications in agriculture, healthcare, education & poverty alleviation.
- Posthuman Implications: What does AI mean for the socio-cultural matrix of the Global South?
- Economic & Colonial Perspectives: Investigate how AI intersects with neoliberalism & capitalism.

Submission Details:
- Abstracts should be submitted by June 1, 2024.
- See the Call for Papers for detailed guidelines and submission instructions. https://sociologica.hse.ru/en/news/919765321.html

Join the Conversation: Let’s bridge the “AI divide” & ensure that AI research reflects the diversity of our global community. Your insights matter!

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Call for Submissions
Precarity and Peacebuilding: Sociological Insights into Global Challenges and Local Responses
Submissions Deadlne: May 30, 2024

The concept of precarity, primarily examined within the economic and labor domains, symbolizes the instability and vulnerability faced by individuals and communities across various societal dimensions. This special issue aims to reframe precarity within the sociological discourse of peacebuilding, exploring how precarity not only influences but also intersects with efforts to build peace in regions marred by conflict and instability. It aims to extend the conversation beyond economic conditions to include cultural, political, and social factors that contribute to precarity and impact peacebuilding processes. The issue is motivated by an understanding that precarity transcends geographical and cultural boundaries, presenting a global challenge that requires sociological insight and innovative policy responses. 

This special issue calls for submissions that unpack the complex dynamics of conflict, peace, and instability through a sociological lens. It will examine existing policies and social movements, identify best practices, and explore innovative approaches to peacebuilding to make recommendations for policymakers, practitioners, and civil society actors working in conflict-affected areas. These recommendations may include policy reforms, grassroots initiatives, community-based interventions, and advocacy campaigns aimed at addressing the root causes of conflict, promoting dialogue and reconciliation, and building sustainable peace from the ground up. By situating the discussion within varied geopolitical contexts - from armed conflicts and political violence to economic crises and social unrest - this issue aims to contribute to positive social change, enhance resilience, and promote peace and stability in precarious contexts around the world. 

We invite original research articles, theoretical papers, and case studies that engage with the intersections of precarity, peacebuilding, social movements, and policy interventions. Contributions that offer comparative perspectives or focus on the Global South are particularly welcome, as are those that incorporate feminist perspectives, and other frameworks that enrich the sociological discourse on precarity and peacebuilding. 

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: 

  • Sociological analyses of how precarity affects peacebuilding initiatives and the lived experiences of communities in conflict-affected areas. 
  • The role of social movements functioning within precarious spaces and how they shape peace processes, with a focus on grassroots activism, dialogue, and reconciliation efforts. 
  • The effectiveness of policy interventions in addressing issues related to precarity and their impact on societal stability and peace. 
  • The role of community-based strategies for addressing the root causes of conflict and building sustainable peace, drawing on empirical case studies and theoretical analysis. 

Submission Instructions

Timetable leading up to submission to the Journal 

  • Submit 300-word Abstract, working title, and short bio to shaht@ohio.edu: 30 May 2024 
  • Acceptance Notifications: 10 June 2024 
  • Submit full articles (no more than 15,000 words) to the journal ScholarOne by selecting "special issue Precarity and Peacebuilding”01 December 2024  
  • Full Article submission for Peer Review: 05 December 2024  
  • Review Results Returned: 28 Feb 2025 
  • R&R and final acceptance notification: 01 June 2025 

Learn more.

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Call for Papers
Parents’ responsibilities
Exploring new contexts, practices, social relations, and discourse

Deadlines:
Abstracts are due by June 30, 2024. All abstracts (500 words), with 5 keywords, should be sent as e-mail attachments to: morenatartari@gmail.com and sarah.murru@kuleuven.be
Submission of first versions of chapters to the editors by November 30, 2024. Papers – written in English – should follow the publisher guidelines.
Communication from the Editors concerning the peer-review process by January 31, 2024.
Revised and edited versions sent to the Editors by March 15, 2025.
Estimated publication on Fall 2025

View the full call here.

Call for papers for a book edited by Morena Tartari (Northumbria University and Babeş-Bolyai University) & Sarah Murru (KU Leuven).
Bristol University Press (BUP) has expressed an interest in working with us on developing this proposal under consideration for the Sociology of Children and Families series.

This volume seeks to understand how parents’ responsibilities are discursively organized in different contexts and how this affects daily family practices and relations. In particular, it seeks to address how new family forms, such as separated families practicing SPC or same-sex parents, as well as new or diverse family practices, such as intensive parenting or “zero waste parenting”, shape new understandings of responsibility. In Western societies, individuals’ actions are increasingly assessed in terms of responsibility, accountability, and autonomy (Giddens, 1992; Beck and Beck-Gernsheim, 1995). Professionals, scholars, entrepreneurs, educators, teachers, can feel pressure to be responsible, accountable, or ethical.

Responsibility can be attributed to individuals and institutions, with different consequences, roles, and functions. Yet some individuals and activities seem to be more exposed than others to this pressure. In particular, parents in the neoliberal, competitive context, seem to be increasingly held responsible for the wellbeing, success, health, and more, of their children (Finch & Mason, 1993). The link between responsibility and family relationships has been widely studied. Apart from the more obvious legally-bounded forms of responsibilities between spouses or parent-children relationships (Finch 2016), scholarship has also investigated the concept of responsibility between family members that are not formally regulated (e.g., Ranson 2013; Porter 2010), the implications of family responsibilities for family practices (see for instance, Morgan 2011; Vincent & Ball, 2007), as well as the moral obligations attached to kinship relations (Ribbens McCarthy et al, 2000). Literature on parenting practices highlights how parent’s sense of responsibility in most efficiently equipping their children also has implications on their anxiety. Literature that conceptualizes parental burn-out (Roskam et al, 2021), and mental load (Luthra & Haux, 2022; Dean et al, 2021) highlights an increase in stress related to parental responsibility, especially in connection to intensive parenting practices (e.g., Faircloth 2014; Smith & Craig 2017). While recent scholarship has emphasized the need to further investigate the connections between responsibility, practices, and relationships (Bennet & Bergström, 2015), we also target the need to look into what shapes these: discourse.

Institutional discourses have shaped not only parents’ responsibilities but also practitioners’ responsibilities in terms of evaluation of parental responsibilities (e.g., Kruk 2010;) and studies have shown how policies discursively addressed and shaped parental responsibilities (e.g., Gillies 2008). Several studies within critical sociological approaches argue the central role of institutions in affecting parents’ everyday practices and relationships even in terms of responsibility, in particular in presence of diverse family forms (see for instance Griffith & Smith 2005; Luken & Vaughan 2006) or when particular family issues are detected by practitioners (e.g., Maher et al 2013).

In the context of new polarizing societal challenges, such as, for instance, climate change and environmental issues on the one hand (Matthies et al 2012; Iwaniec & Curdt-Christiansen 2020), and intensification of the use of technology in parenting and displays of “good parenting” practices online on the other hand (Tartari et al, 2023), we highlight the importance of understanding the role of these new parenting practices on family relations as well as new institutional discourses on parental responsibilities that nurture these.

This volume aims to address the following main question: How are parental responsibilities (re)shaped in the context of evolving family practices and societal transformation? We are particularly interested in contributions which aim to analyze how parental responsibilities are discursively constructed and how these “constructs” affect everyday family practices.

This special issue especially welcomes the following topics:
- How parental responsibilities are discursively constructed in different sectors like education, health care, labor market, etc.
- How parental responsibilities are discursively constructed in relation to different family forms (single parents, LGBTQ+ parents, etc.) and how this affects everyday practices?
- How parental responsibilities are constructed in welfare states and in other contexts? Which similarities and differences? What resources/social capital is linked to practicing responsibility in these contexts?
- Which forms of (everyday) resistance are connected to family responsibility discourses and/or challenge/reframe dominant discourses?
- How family responsibility discourses do affect or interact with forms of citizenship?
- How do gender or other intersectional dimensions affect or are involved in the responsibility discourses?

We are particularly interested in bringing to light the hidden work of parents and practitioners and valorize their perspective and experience. Studies which use quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods are welcome, as well as theoretical analyses.

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Call for Papers
Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion, Volume 17 (Forthcoming 2026)
Religion and Non-Religion in Family Life
Editored By: Morena Tartari, Babeş-Bolyai University, Romania and Olga Breskaya, University of Padova

Submission Deadline: 31 July 2024

The family relates to the intertwining of relations and everyday interactions in which values, traditions and beliefs are molded and transferred from one generation to the next, including religious and non-religious beliefs, values and practices. Two processes are central to shaping religious and non-religious dynamics within the fabric of family relations.

First, a growing diversity in personal and family life marked by transformations in family forms, relationships, roles, intimacies, living arrangements and routines has a significant impact on transmission of religious and non-religious beliefs and practices. Divorce, cohabitation, same-sex unions, and single parenthood rates are increasing and often perceived as a threat to traditional societal and family values. Second, economic and cultural changes have brought a decline in religiousness and increase in non-religiousness, indicating a secularization process in western societies in the last decades. Institutionalized religions are challenged by alternative forms of religiosity and spirituality, leading to greater individualization within family religious life as well. At the same time, the increasing presence of religious minorities in numerous societies around the globe has prompted a re-evaluation of the secular/religious nexus, especially within the familial domain where beliefs and values intersect.

This volume aims to contribute to a more profound understanding of the relationship between family dynamics, its role in transmitting religion and non-religion and contemporary religious change. We invite contributions with a wide range of theories and methods in analyzing this topic, and in particular, papers dealing with the following issues:

• family structure and religious and non-religious landscapes
• religious and non-religious parenting cultures in the Global South and North
• spiritual diversity and family life
• religion/non-religion and conflict in marital and parent‐child relationships
• family schooling and parents' (non)religiosity
• family and religious and non-religious activism
• religious and non-religious dimensions and transformation of family relationships, including issues like separation/divorce, work-life balance, new family forms

Please send proposals (400 words) and a brief bio to Morena TartariLearn more

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Call for Papers
Fifteenth International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society
Hosted by Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
19-20 June 2025

Submission Deadline: 19 August 2024

Founded in 2011, Religion in Society Research Network explores the relationship between religion in society and the changing nature of spirituality. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensions.
 
The Fifteenth International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society calls for research addressing the following annual themes and special focus:
  • 2025 Special Focus—Fragile Meanings: Vulnerability in the Study of Religions and Spirituality

  • Theme 1: Religious Foundations

  • Theme 2: Religious Community and Socialization

  • Theme 3: Religious Commonalities and Differences

  • Theme 4: The Politics of Religion

We are interested in the following lines of investigation:   

  • On the sources, modes, and manifestations of religiosity.

  • On learning religious ways, spiritual ways of life, and religious institutions.

  • On variations in religious forms and the relationships between different religions.

  • On the relations of religion to the state and civil society.

Religion in Society Research Network also supports a book imprint and a collection of journals.

Call for Papers
Revitalizing Applied Anthropology
Hosted by the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) in Portland, OR
 March 25-29, 2025
The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers, posters, and videos) for the Program of the 85th Annual Meeting in Portland, OR, March 25-29, 2025. The theme of the Program is “Revitalizing Applied Anthropology.”

The 2025 SfAA Annual Meeting offers researchers, practitioners, and students from diverse disciplines and organizations the opportunity to discuss their work and consider how it can contribute to a better future. SfAA members come from a host of disciplines -- anthropology, geography, sociology, economics, business, planning, medicine, nursing, law, and more. The annual meeting provides a fertile venue in which to trade ideas, methods, and practical solutions, as well as an opportunity to enter the lifeworlds of other professionals.

The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2024. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page www.appliedanthro.org and click on annual meeting.

If you have a webpage for links, please add the following:

The Society for Applied Anthropology is pleased to announce our 85th Annual Meeting in Portland, OR, March 25-29, 2025. 

For meeting information visit www.appliedanthro.org/annual-meeting
Call for Papers
Fifthteenth International Conference on the Constructed Environment
Hosted by Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin (HTW Berlin) - Campus Wilhelminenhof, Berlin, Germany + Online
10-11 April 2025

Submission Deadline: 10 January 2025

Founded in 2010, the Constructed Environment Research Network is brought together by a common shared interest in human configurations of the environment and the interactions among the constructed, social and natural environments. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensions. Learn more about registration and submission.

Special Focus—Sharing Practices and Sustainable Urban Fabrics

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Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals
NIJ's FY24 Research and Evaluation on School Safety Solicitation

Submission Deadline: 07 May 2024 (Grants.gov) and 21 May 2024 (JustGrants)

For the 2024 solicitation, Research and Evaluation on School Safety, NIJ seeks proposals for rigorous research and evaluation projects to fill knowledge gaps in two topical areas: 1) studies on the root causes and consequences of school violence and 2) examinations of the impact and effectiveness of awards made for purposes authorized under the STOP School Violence Act. The solicitation is available here.

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Ongoing Calls

Call for Manuscripts
African Educational Research Journal (AERJ)

African Educational Research Journal (AERJ) is a peer-reviewed open access journal which publishes high-quality articles in all areas of Education. African Educational Research Journal publishes original empirical and theoretical studies and analyses in education that constitute significant contributions to the understanding and/or improvement of educational processes and outcomes.

AERJ is currently accepting manuscripts for publication. Send manuscript attached as MS word to aerj.submit@netjournals.org or aerj.submit@gmail.com.

All manuscripts are reviewed by qualified reviewers and the review outcomes are sent back within two to three weeks of receipt of the article. Following acceptance, the paper will be published in the next available issue.

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Call for Papers and Special Issue Proposals
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research

The Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research is unique in providing collective coverage of aggression, conflict and peace research, which are often separated disciplines. The journal’s approach stems from the ethos that in order to understand conflict and aggression it is also necessary to understand peace and conflict resolution (and vice versa). JACPR publishes a broad range of international original articles and review papers on all aspects of aggression, conflict and peace. It is aimed at both academic and practice development, with a clear remit of translating research findings into implementations for practice. Papers published in JACPR are double blind peer-reviewed.

To submit your research, please visit the journal’s ScholarOne website. In preparing papers, authors are asked to follow the standard JACPR Author Guidelines, which are available hereIf you have a special issue idea, please contact Commissioning Editor Catherine McAteer (cmcateer@emerald.com) for a proposal form.

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Conferences

2024 Conference on Discrimination in the 21st Century: Fostering Conversations Across Fields
Chicago, Illinois
14-15 May 2024

We welcome all submissions for the third annual Conference on Discrimination in the 21st Century: Fostering Conversations Across Fields. This year’s conference will be held May 14-15, 2024, in Chicago. This conference will bring together researchers from different fields to discuss crucial themes around discrimination. Experts from economics, sociology, law, behavioral sciences, healthcare, artificial intelligence, and more will interact with each other through presentations and open panel discussions. This cross-disciplinary conference will be organized around themes related to discrimination, such as (a) freedom of expression and inclusion; (b) artificial intelligence and disparities; and (c) responses to perceived discrimination. The organizing committee welcomes submissions on the broadest range of themes. Participation in this conference is by invitation only. If you have any questions, please contact bfi-events@uchicago.edu.

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Fourteenth International Conference on Religion & Sprituality in Society
Hosted by University of Madrid in Madrid, Spain
23-24 May 2024

Founded in 2011, the Religion in Society Research Network explores the relationship between religion in society and the changing nature of spirituality. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensions.

Find out more about the Fourteenth International Conference on Religion & Spirituality in Society registration

Special Focus—Space, Movement, Time: Religions at Rest and in Movement

Nineteenth International Conference on the Arts in Society 
Hosted by Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin (HTW Berlin) - Campus Wilhelminenhof, Berlin, Germany + Online
24-26 May 2024

The Nineteenth International Conference on the Arts in Society offers an interdisciplinary forum for discussion of the role of the arts in society. It is a place for critical engagement, examination, and experimentation, developing ideas that connect the arts to their contexts in the world – on stage, in studios and theaters, in classrooms, in museums and galleries, on the streets and in communities. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensionsLearn more about registration

Special Focus—Art for Sustenance

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Law and Society Association Annual Meeting
Unsettling Territories: Tradition and Revolution in Law and Society
6-9 June 2024 in Denver, Colorado
What began with a breakfast meeting in 1964 has become a global tradition. 2024 marks the 60th anniversary of the Law and Society Association. This year’s annual meeting returns to Denver, the site of the Association’s first summer institute on social science methods in legal education.

The annual meeting marks more than an anniversary for law and society. 2024 is also the 60th anniversary of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964 – a landmark antidiscrimination law enacted 100 years after Black Americans in the Colorado territory first petitioned for the right to vote – and the termination of the Bracero program that powerfully shaped U.S. immigration policy.  2024 also stands out as the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Immigration Act of 1924, which established the U.S. Border Patrol and banned immigration from Asia. The year 1924 also saw the enactment of the U.S. Indian Citizenship Act, which declared that all non-citizen Native Americans within the United States were citizens.

Fifteenth International Conference on Sport & Society
Hosted by the University of Granada, Granada, Spain
13-14 June 2024

Founded in 2010, the Sport & Society Research Network is brought together around a common interest in cultural, political, and economic relationships of sport to society. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries.

Special FocusTeaching & Learning Physical Education

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Fifteenth International Conference on Sport and Society
Hosted by University of Granada, Granada, Spain and Online
13-14 June 2024

Founded in 2010, the Sport & Society Research Network is brought together around a common interest in cultural, political, and economic relationships of sport to society. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. Learn more about registration.

Expanding social horizons requires a modernization of the education system, and this is just as much the case for Physical Education as every other area of the curriculum. Physical Education is a way of promoting sporting and related social values in students from an early age. Recent methodological trends in Physical Education teaching focus on the role of student interests in developing motivation and engagement. They point to pedagogical models as the primary tool for achieving these goals, supported by productive peer relations, self-discipline, or personal autonomy. Hybridizing multiple pedagogical models allows teachers to adapt their teaching methodologies to the ever-changing school context. In these ways, Physical Education is now brought closer to students' needs and interests. Additionally, competence-based teaching has become established in educational policy around the world as a means to set and evaluate pedagogical goals. In these ways, an interdisciplinary subject such as Physical Education meets our society's social and educational requirements.

Special Focus—Teaching & Learning Physical Education

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2024 ALPS Annual Meeting
Hosted by Pepperdine Caruso School of Law, Malibu, California
13-15 June 2024

The Association for Law, Property & Society (ALPS) will hold its next annual meeting in person at the Pepperdine Caruso School of Law in Malibu, California, USA, from June 13-15, 2024. The ALPS meeting dates include an optional pre-conference field trip on the afternoon of Thursday, June 13. There will also be a welcome reception after the field trip. The academic portion of the conference will take place on Friday, June 14 and Saturday, June and 15, with concurrent panels and plenary sessions running on both days. Please follow the ALPS Annual Meeting webpage for more information as the conference and associated meeting events are finalized, including links to register for the meeting. 

ALPS is an open and welcoming international organization of scholars and teachers engaged in a wide range of interdisciplinary research covering all aspects of property law, policy, and theory, and the role property plays in social structures, human relationships, and ecology. We seek to promote informed dialogue among diverse scholars at all stages of their careers from around the world and in many disciplines through conferences, publications, workshops, and mentoring

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2024 SAR Global Congress
Hosted by European Humanities University (EHU), Vilnius, Lithuania
25-27 June 2024

We are pleased to announce to the SAR Network that we will host a 2024 Global Congress from June 25-27, 2024 in partnership with the European Humanities University (EHU) in Vilnius, Lithuania. The theme, "Sustainable knowledge: Lessons from universities, scholars and students in exile," seeks to explore and capture the experience of current and prior generations of academic communities forced into exile by political unrest, repression, disaster and conflict.

The Global Congress is SAR’s largest convening and held generally every 2-3 years. The event brings together network members and partners to learn, share experiences, build solidarity, and inform SAR’s activities and agenda for the coming years.

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Twenty-fourth International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations
Hosted by Lusiada University, Lisbon, Portugal and Online
3-5 July 2024

Founded in 2000, the Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations Research Network is brought together by a shared interest in human differences and diversity, and their varied manifestations in organizations, communities, and nations. We aim to traverse a broad terrain, sometimes technically and other times socially oriented, sometimes theoretical and other times practical in their perspective, and sometimes reflecting dispassionate analysis while at other times suggesting interested strategies for action. Our aim is to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries.

At the Twenty-fourth International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations, we offer nature-based solutions as one of the strategies that allow us to tackle the challenges of climate change effectively. We also believe in the transforming power of transdisciplinary scientific dialogue, collaboration, co-construction of solutions, creative freedom, and hope as a means of strengthening more resilient, solidary, humane, and democratic communities. In this spirit, we invite research that addresses the socio-environmental challenges of the current climate emergency.

Special FocusThe Future We Want: Socio-Environmental Challenges in Times of Climate Emergency

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Twenty-fourth International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations
Hosted by Lusiada University, Lisbon, Portugal
3-5 July 2024

The Twenty-fourth International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations features research addressing the following annual themes: Identity and Belonging, Education and Learning in Worlds of Differences, Organizational Diversity, and Community Diversity and Governance.

For over 20 years, we've aimed to traverse a broad terrain, sometimes technically and other times socially oriented, sometimes theoretical and other times practical in their perspective, and sometimes reflecting dispassionate analysis while at other times suggesting interested strategies for action. We welcome returning and new members to add their voices to the conversation.

Special Focus—The Future We Want: Socio-Environmental Challenges in Times of Climate Emergency

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Twenty-fourth International Conference on Knowledge, Culture, and Change in Organizations
Hosted by Lusiada University, Lisbon, Portugal and Online
3-5 July 2024

Founded in 1993, the Organization Studies Research Network comes together around a common concern for, and a shared interest to explore, new possibilities in knowledge, culture and change management, within the broader context of the nature and future of organizations and their impact on society. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries.

At the Twenty-fourth International Conference on Knowledge, Culture, and Change in Organizations, we offer nature-based solutions as one of the strategies that allow us to tackle the challenges of climate change effectively. We also believe in the transforming power of transdisciplinary scientific dialogue, collaboration, co-construction of solutions, creative freedom, and hope as a means of strengthening more resilient, solidary, humane, and democratic communities. In this spirit, we invite research that addresses the socio-environmental challenges of the current climate emergency and the role of organizations as agents of change.

Special FocusThe Future We Want: Organizational Responsibilities for Climate Responses

Thirty-First International Conference on Learning
Hosted by Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands and Online 
10-12 July 2024

Founded in 1989, The Learner Research Network is brought together around a common concern for learning in all its sites, formal and informal, and at all levels, from early childhood, to schools, colleges and universities, and adult, community and workplace education. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensions.

Throughout the Thirty-First International Conference on Learning, attendees will have the opportunity to engage with leading scholars, practitioners, and policymakers from around the world. Together, we will examine best practices, share research findings, and engage in thought-provoking discussions aimed at shaping the future of inclusive education. We invite educators, researchers, policymakers, and advocates to join us in this exploration of the converging challenges facing inclusive education. Together, we will forge a path toward a more inclusive, culturally responsive, and digitally literate educational landscape, ensuring that all learners are prepared to thrive in our increasingly interconnected world. Learn more about conference registration.

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Nineteenth International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences
Hosted by Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland + Online
17-19 July 2024

Founded in 2006, the Interdisciplinary Social Sciences Research Network is brought together by a common interest in disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches, within and across the various social sciences, and between the social, natural and applied sciences. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensions.

This conference aims to capture the implications of migration – of people and ideas – in politics, economy and culture. It challenges what scholars have called the “sedentary bias” (Bakewell 2008) and instead takes migration as a given, a defining feature of the globalizing world. Learn more about registration.

Special Focus—The World on the Move: Understanding Migration in a New Global Age

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Seventeenth Global Studies Conference
Hosted by Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland + Online
17-19 July 2024

Founded in 2008, the Global Studies Research Network is devoted to mapping and interpreting past and emerging trends and patterns in globalization. We aim to traverse a broad terrain, sometimes technically and other times socially oriented, sometimes theoretical and other times practical in their perspective, and sometimes reflecting dispassionate analysis while at other times suggesting interested strategies for action. Our aim is to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries.

This conference aims to capture the implications of migration – of people and ideas – in politics, economy and culture. It challenges what scholars have called the “sedentary bias” (Bakewell 2008) and instead takes migration as a given, a defining feature of the globalizing world. Learn more about the registration.

Special Focus—The World on the Move: Understanding Migration in a New Global Age

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The Society for the Study of Social Problems 74th Annual Meeting 
Montréal, Canada
9-11 August 2024

The Society for the Study of Social Problems' 2024 Annual Meeting will take place in Montréal, Canada with the theme Toward a Sociology of Violence. What and how can sociology contribute to understanding and reducing violence? Public policy and discourse often point to individual-level solutions to the social problem of violence, rather than addressing root causes that create the context in which violence and calls for violence flourish. As sociologists and members of SSSP, we can draw on decades of sociological, anti-racist, feminist, and anti-colonial research to develop concrete solutions to the problem of violence. By focusing on cultural, institutional, and structural change, we can contribute to a transformative politics that challenges carceral solutions to violence in favor of models fostering alternative forms of justice. Learn more.

Special Focus—Toward a Sociology of Violence

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Seventeenth International Conference on the Inclusive Museum 
Hosted by MusemsQuartier, Vienna, Austria and Online
13-15 September 2024

Founded in 2008, The Inclusive Museum Research Network is brought together by a shared concern for the future role of the museum and how it can become more inclusive. We seek to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. As a Research Network, we are defined by our scope and concerns and motivated to build strategies for action framed by our shared themes and tensionsLearn more about registration.

We have reached the critical turning point eight years on with seven to go for realising the UN 2030 Agenda addressing the Sustainable Development Goals. The new Museum Definition of ICOM and the seminal UNESCO Museum Recommendation position museums as civil society agents in this process through local action adding to national and international aspirations and active citizenship. The challenge is locating museums within the holistic framework of cultural, economic, social and environmental sustainability. The intersectionality of the momentum across all cultural borders for climate justice, poverty alleviation and inclusion must be innovative charting path breaking approaches bridging the gulf between the Global North and the Global South. 17 Museums and 17 SDGs is an illustrative museum movement in Austria that has global relevance and lessons. This action strategy together with a range of European and international arts, museum and heritage case studies from all the continents provides for multilateralism, cultural exchanges and collaborative learning as we meet next In Vienna.

Special Focus—Intersectionality: Museums, Inclusion, and SDGs

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Aging & Social Change: Fourteenth Interdisciplinary Conference
Hosted by University of Galway, Galway, Ireland
19-20 September 2024

We are pleased to share the call for papers for Aging & Social Change: Fourteenth Interdisciplinary Conferenceto be hosted by the University of Galway, Galway, Ireland, 19-20 September 2024. For over 10 years, we've offered a place for exploring the dynamic interplay between aging and society. We welcome returning and new members to add their voices to the conversation.

All presenters are also encouraged to submit their papers to the companion journal, The Journal of Aging and Social Change. Find out more about the journal and submission process.

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